Behind the Scenes of Bound

Here, Sequence's Australian-based Partner and Creative Director Luke Bicevskis reveals how we approached the trailer for Plastic Studio's Bound, expressing the balletic, graceful essence of the core gameplay.

WHAT WAS YOUR BRIEF FOR THE CREATION OF THE BOUND TRAILER?

Our brief for Bound was focused on the need to maintain a genuine in-game look, while also giving the trailer a cinematic feel. This direction from the developer, Plastic, led us to find a creative way to tease the core concepts and themes of the game, while also showcasing its strong visual aesthetic.  

HOW DID YOU APPROACH THE MAKING OF THIS PROJECT?

The production process was very similar to most of our cinematic trailers. As always, understanding and having an open dialogue with our clients was crucial to understanding the final piece. 

We started by concepting and storyboarding the piece. We then worked using some assets provided from the game itself, building up an animatic for timing and angles. This was the most involved part of the production; getting edit locked meant the rest would fall into place. 

Once this preliminary version was approved by the client we focused on the finer animation, visual effects and lighting. We also concepted some different render looks to make sure our final result would present an accurate representation of the game world.  

Separately, we also worked on the motion graphic aspect of the final logo build.

HOW DID YOU ENSURE THE TONE OF THE GAME CAME THROUGH IN THE TRAILER?

Many elements in the game are generated and animated procedurally – it was important to faithfully recreate this in the trailer. We also needed to ensure the timing and movement was hand crafted to deliver impact. 

We worked with a base of animation sets captured from the game. We adjusted and amended them to work within the angles of the edit. The other environment and ribbons were all hand crafted to mirror how these objects move and react in the game.

The music provided by composer and performer Oleg Heinali Shpudeiko made it easier for us to create something that moved with the same elegance of the game.

WHAT TIPS DO YOU HAVE FOR PEOPLE LOOKING TO CREATE SIMILAR ANIMATIONS?

Don't think of visual and audio as separate elements. In the real world our senses work together to construct what's around us. When limited to only two it's vital to make them work together. Once you have a base that has a sense of rhythm, structure and tone the rest will come easily.